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#squirrel #squadgoals #pittbull #pittbullsofinstagram #pittbullsoftheworld #likefatherlikeson #loyaltyiseverything #unconditionallove #notapet #family
❤️ #Chester . . . . #primates #primaterescuecenter #photography #happywednesday #happy #wednesday #love #cute #cuteanimals #wild #wildanimals #notapet #outside #outdoors #kentucky #kentuckyproud #monkey #monkeys #wildandfree #spidermonkey #cutebaby
@Regrann from @joelsartore A baby critically endangered Bornean orangutan named Aurora, with her adoptive mother, Cheyenne, a Bornean/Sumatran cross at the @HoustonZoo The Bornean orangutan is the largest arboreal (tree dwelling) animal alive, with mature males reaching up to 220 pounds and growing to four and a half feet tall. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path to extinction. To see portraits of a Sumatran orangutan, check out @natgeo. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutans #Borneo #borneanorangutan #babyanimals #NOTAPET #palmoil #notopalmoil #photoark #natgeo - #regrann
Little guy we found on our cape adventures :) #lizard #straya #Australia #yallingup #beach #adventures #cape #southwest #aussie #oi #pets #notapet #goodfind
❤ my heart #naturesbeauty #naturenerd #beautiful #opossum #virginiaopossum #possum #marsupial #marsupialsofinstagram #friendnotfoe #notapet #rescue #sanctuary #animalsofinstagram #cuddles #ilovemyjob
Seriously one of the most beautiful creatures ever #sanctuary #notapet #rescue #animalsofinstagram #feline #cat #bigcat #catsofinstagram #africanservalcat #servalcat #beautiful #naturenerd #naturesbeauty #bigcatsofinstagram
Love me some Sheila Roo! #naturesbeauty #naturenerd #newguineasingingdog #singingdog #dog #dogsofig #canine #animalsofinstagram #rescue #notapet #sanctuary #toocute #beautiful
@Regrann from @joelsartore - A baby critically endangered Bornean orangutan named Aurora, with her adoptive mother, Cheyenne, a Bornean/Sumatran cross at the @HoustonZoo. (Swipe for more) The Bornean orangutan is the largest arboreal (tree dwelling) animal alive, with mature males reaching up to 220 pounds and growing to four and a half feet tall. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path to extinction. To see portraits of a Sumatran orangutan, check out @natgeo. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutans #Borneo #borneanorangutan #babyanimals #NOTAPET #palmoil #notopalmoil #photoark #natgeo #govegan #veganfriendly #orangutans #theorangutanproject
😮😮#Repost @natgeo with @repostapp ・・・ Images by @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. (Swipe for more) Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo
#Repost @endextinctionintl ・・・ #Repost @natgeo ・・・ Images by @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. (Swipe for more) Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo
#Repost @natgeo ・・・ Images by @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. (Swipe for more) Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo
Repost from @joelsartore using @RepostRegramApp - A baby critically endangered Bornean orangutan named Aurora, with her adoptive mother, Cheyenne, a Bornean/Sumatran cross at the @HoustonZoo. (Swipe for more) The Bornean orangutan is the largest arboreal (tree dwelling) animal alive, with mature males reaching up to 220 pounds and growing to four and a half feet tall. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path to extinction. To see portraits of a Sumatran orangutan, check out @natgeo. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutans #Borneo #borneanorangutan #babyanimals #NOTAPET #palmoil #notopalmoil #photoark #natgeo
regram @natgeo Images by @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. (Swipe for more) Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo
@Regrann from @joelsartore - A baby critically endangered Bornean orangutan named Aurora, with her adoptive mother, Cheyenne, a Bornean/Sumatran cross at the @HoustonZoo. (Swipe for more) The Bornean orangutan is the largest arboreal (tree dwelling) animal alive, with mature males reaching up to 220 pounds and growing to four and a half feet tall. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path to extinction. To see portraits of a Sumatran orangutan, check out @natgeo. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutans #Borneo #borneanorangutan #babyanimals #NOTAPET #palmoil #notopalmoil #photoark #natgeo - #regrann
🙏🌏 #porfavorpara #pleasestop #detente #stop #ayuda #help #🐒 #Repost @natgeo with @repostapp ・・・ Images by @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. (Swipe for more) Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo
@natgeo ・・・ Images by @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. (Swipe for more) Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo
#Repost @natgeo with @repostapp ・・・ Images by @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. (Swipe for more) Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo
Mom and me back in 1981, when I was still an only child. Them were the days. #wcw #animals #mothersanddaughters #family #blessed #god #jesus #babyjesus #lulz #instagood #priceless @Regrann from @joelsartore: A baby critically endangered Bornean orangutan named Aurora, with her adoptive mother, Cheyenne, a Bornean/Sumatran cross at the @HoustonZoo. (Swipe for more) The Bornean orangutan is the largest arboreal (tree dwelling) animal alive, with mature males reaching up to 220 pounds and growing to four and a half feet tall. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path to extinction. To see portraits of a Sumatran orangutan, check out @natgeo. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutans #Borneo #borneanorangutan #babyanimals #NOTAPET #palmoil #notopalmoil #photoark #natgeo
Because every now and then we need animal adorableness to educate us and make us smile! #animalkingdom #allcreaturesgreatandsmall @joelsartore with @repostapp ・・・ A baby critically endangered Bornean orangutan named Aurora, with her adoptive mother, Cheyenne, a Bornean/Sumatran cross at the @HoustonZoo. (Swipe for more) The Bornean orangutan is the largest arboreal (tree dwelling) animal alive, with mature males reaching up to 220 pounds and growing to four and a half feet tall. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path to extinction. To see portraits of a Sumatran orangutan, check out @natgeo. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutans #Borneo #borneanorangutan #babyanimals #NOTAPET #palmoil #notopalmoil #photoark #natgeo
@Regrann from @natgeo - Images by @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. (Swipe for more) Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo - #regrann
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It's #slowloris #fluff time! As slow lorises get older their bottoms get less fluffy! Maybe that fluffy bum makes them look larger to predators! #lorislove #lemur #primate #nocturnal #wildandfree #notapet #littlefirefaceproject
If I am ever reincarnated, I just may come back as an orangutan. Beautiful!!! Repost from @natgeo using @RepostRegramApp - Images by @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. (Swipe for more) Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo
#Repost @natgeo with @repostapp ・・・ Images by @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. (Swipe for more) Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo
regram @natgeo Images by @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. (Swipe for more) Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo
#Repost @natgeo with @repostapp ・・・ Images by @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. (Swipe for more) Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products, so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo
My God! Beautiful! 😘😍😘😍😘😍 Hi Aurora, hi Cheyenne. . . @Regrann from @joelsartore - A baby critically endangered Bornean orangutan named Aurora, with her adoptive mother, Cheyenne, a Bornean/Sumatran cross at the @HoustonZoo. (Swipe for more) The Bornean orangutan is the largest arboreal (tree dwelling) animal alive, with mature males reaching up to 220 pounds and growing to four and a half feet tall. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path to extinction. To see portraits of a Sumatran orangutan, check out @natgeo. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutans #Borneo #borneanorangutan #babyanimals #NOTAPET #palmoil #photoark #natgeo #Regrann
Hi Suzie! She's beautiful. Absolutely beautiful. . . . @Regrann from @natgeo - Images by @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. (Swipe for more) Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products, so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo #Regrann
Via @natgeo 📷 @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products, so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo
A baby critically endangered Bornean orangutan named Aurora, with her adoptive mother, Cheyenne, a Bornean/Sumatran cross at the @HoustonZoo. (Swipe for more) The Bornean orangutan is the largest arboreal (tree dwelling) animal alive, with mature males reaching up to 220 pounds and growing to four and a half feet tall. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path to extinction. To see portraits of a Sumatran orangutan, check out @natgeo. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutans #Borneo #borneanorangutan #babyanimals #NOTAPET #palmoil #notopalmoil #photoark #natgeo
Images by @joelsartore | A critically endangered Sumatran orangutan named Suzie at the @GladysPorterZoo. (Swipe for more) Female Sumatran orangutans never leave the trees of the forest and males touch the ground very rarely. There are only nine populations of Sumatran orangutans left, and only seven of those have optimistic prospects of long-term viability. Despite legal protection in Indonesia, Sumatran orangutans are still taken from the wild to be kept as pets; they are often considered status symbols in households. Orangutans depend on high-quality forests to live in. Unfortunately, many orangutan populations are located in unprotected areas where humans have begun to develop palm oil plantations and other agricultural farmland. Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on Earth and is used in 50% of all packaged products (including shampoo, lipstick, and ice cream), so the demand to continue developing these plantations is high. Deliberate fires set to clear land, as well as killing upon sight by developers, are a significant threats to orangutans. Taking young orangutans from the wild and exporting them into the pet trade is also devastating to the species. Since females give birth every eight or nine years to just one infant at a time, even a 1% decrease in female orangutans per year could put this species on a permanent path toward extinction. To see portraits of a baby Bornean orangutan with its adopted mother, check out @joelsartore. . . #savetheorangutans #orangutan #Sumatra #sumatranorangutans #palmoil #notopalmoil #NOTAPET #photoark #natgeo
Just because you may need a laugh. This is fossil Dino poop. Show your kids, it's huge! #laugh #fossil #rock #poop #Dino #gemshow #display #notapet
Amara🐱 #rescuezoo #zookeeper #zookreepers #lioness #lion #enrichment #lionsofinstagram #notapet #softkittywarmkittylittleballoffur
wish you grow up healthy and happy #notapet #leopardcat #pussycat #wildfire #victim #wildliferescue
Monkeys everywhere you go. #india #monkeys #wild #free #notapet #monkeysofindia #keoladeonationalpark
Was super lucky and grateful that the rangers from Louis Stelzer Park let me check out their collection of native snakes. This was definitely the gem of the collection 💎 #southernpacificrattlesnake #crotalus #crotalusoreganushelleri #rattlesnake #venemous #reptile #herpetology #snake #snakes #colubrid #snakesofinstagram #reptilesofinstagram #nativewildlife #louisastelzercountypark #louisstelzerpark #viper #pitviper #notapet #baby #babyanimals #cascabel
Awe an alligator to play with #alligator #parkpet #floridavacation #florida #kissimmee #pond #noswimming #notapet
Where's the hawk.,, ? #madagascar #lemur #lemurs😊 #lemurians #lemurcatta #lemurlover #earlyprimates #prosimians #prosimiansofinstagram #notapet #endangeredspecies #
Oh he's just so precious ❤ #rescue #sanctuary #notapet #naturenerd #naturesbeauty #beautiful #wildlifecaretaker #ilovemyjob #lemur #brownlemur #primate #primatesofinstagram #prosimian #animaledventures #animalsofinstagram #animalplanet
🦊 #animalsofinstagram #animalplanet #rescue #sanctuary #notapet #redfox #fox #foxesofinstagram #vulpesvulpes #vulpes #beautiful #naturenerd #naturesbeauty #ilovemyjob
#coyote #wildanimal #notapet #drawing #sketch #digital #digitalart #animal #dog #canine #pup
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